Tuesday, 26 August 2014

Python bivittatus (Burmese python) - Sikkim Snake


Python bivittatus (Burmese python)

Venue: Burdang, Singtam,  East Sikkim

Date: June 24, 2014

Pic:
Python bivittatus (Burmese python)

Venue: Burdang, Singtam,  East Sikkim

Date: June 24, 2014

Pic:

In one of a rare instance, a dead python was recovered from the banks of River Teesta near ATTC College, Burdang. It was latter identifies as Burmese python (Python bivittatus).
According to the locals, the snake was 12 feet long and 1.6 m in circumference. It was later on handed over to OM Gurung, Block Officer, Wild Life Department of Fores, Rangpo Range.  
It should be noted that according to The Gazetter of Sikkim (1891), forest officials had arrested several persons for killing a 4 m. long Indian Python (Python moluru bivittatus) near Singtam. 

Scientific classification
Kingdom:            Animalia
Phylum:               Chordata
Class:                   Reptilia
Order:                  Squamata
Family:                Pythonidae
Genus:                 Python
Species:                P. bivittatus
Binomial name:    Python bivittatus (Kuhl, 1820)
Other Names: Burmese python
Special feature:  The Burmese python (Python bivittatus) is one of the five largest snakes in the world, native to a large variation of tropic and subtropic areas of Southern- and Southeast Asia. Until 2009 they were considered a subspecies of Python molurus, but now are recognized as belonging to a distinct speciesThey are often found near water and are sometimes semi-aquatic, but can also be found in trees. Wild individuals average 3.7 metres (12 ft) long, but have been known to reach 5.74 metres (19 ft).  This python is an excellent swimmer and needs a permanent source of water. It can be found in grasslands, marshes, swamps, rocky foothills, woodlands, river valleys, and jungles with open clearings. They are good climbers and have prehensile tails.
Wild populations are considered to be "threatened" and are listed on Appendix II of CITES. IUCN has recently listed the Burmese python as "Vulnerable", reflecting its overall population decline. Important reasons for the decline are trade for skins and for food; habitat degradation may be a problem in some upland areas. In Hong Kong, it is a protected species under Wild Animals Protection Ordinance Cap 170. (Wikipedia)
  
When compared with Indian Rock Python : 
 by Vivek Sharma    (ReptileIndia)
Burmese Pythons have side patches (on flank) more defined and much larger than those found in Indian Rock Python. In Indian Rock Python they are very small and usually not much significant to discuss. Additionally Burmese Python has much less or no yellow-brown amounts on body while in Indian Rock Python you can find these two colors have much significance.

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